Saturday, October 1, 2011

divulge

I'm doing a kind of writing course this month through the Southeast Review. I've done it before, so I can tell you that the set up is that each day they give you various sorts of writing prompts, interviews and so on to get you to pump out a lot of material. I'm not usually all that successful at keeping up with it, but its a good program and I recommend it if you have some extra hours in the day. The last piece of the thing every day is a 'riff' word that you can use in any way you like. I thought it might be fun to use a few of them on the blog if they fit, and the first one does.

Of course I know what "divulge" means. It means to reveal something hidden--a secret, maybe, or even something buried physically. Something is brought to the light.

But I find that 'vulge' intriguing. I guess it's because it reminds me of bulge and also of revulsion, but there's a kind of disgorging imagery going on in my head. I can't seem to figure out the etymology on this one.

***

Hmm. I guess I forgot to say that I did wonder if somehow the '-vulge' could in any way be related to 'vulgar'. I knew that the Vulgate was the Bible translated into the common language of the Roman people, which was great as long everyone understood Latin. And I did know that 'vulgar' was just a way of saying common, which is often misconstrued by the upper classes as meaning something low. But I still didn't see how it could shed light on a word about revealing a secret. However, I was making this too hard.

Divulge comes (of course) from the Latin divulgare, which simply meant 'to publish', or 'to make common property'.

It's all right there in the word, isn't it? 

10 comments:

  1. Hmm, makes one want to go start up a little WikiLeaks of his or her own, doesn't it, to make what was once a secret into common knowledge.
    ======================
    Detectives Beyond Borders
    "Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home"
    http://www.detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

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  2. Yep--except for that little aggrevation of possibly ending up in jail.

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  3. Not to be underestimated, really, although either of us might have some success at starting a reading group.

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  4. Yeah, but the screws would probably drag us out of bed at some ungodly hour of the morning, so I'll do my reading on the outside, thanks.

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  5. Me too, if possible.

    Never say never, though.

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  6. I like the 'riff' component of your course.

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  7. I do too, Sheiler, although so far I haven't come up with any creative flights of fancy about them. Also, to be honest, I haven't really been paying much attention to the course, since I got an unexpected trajectory out of something the very first day and I'm kind of going with that.

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  8. pretty funny but I actually signed up for the course 15 days late because of you. I am the underdog. I like playing the underdog.

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  9. That's great! How's it going?

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